[Grammar] Passive verbs

[Grammar] Passive verbs

The most basic kind of conjugation applies to verbs (active). How about conjugated verbs into their passive forms? There are more (complicated) rules to conjugating verbs into their passive forms. For verbs ending with… ㅎ, ㅌ, ㅗ, ㅏ, ㅜ, ㅡ (VOWELS) Add 이다 Examples: 놓다 ->...
[Grammar] ~(으)ㄴ 채로

[Grammar] ~(으)ㄴ 채로

~(으)ㄴ 채로 (~eun/eun chae-ro) – while in the state of (having done something), another thing happened/something else was done This is not to be confused with ~(으)면서. For ~(으)면서, you are referring to two actions being done simultaneously. On the other hand, for ~(으)ㄴ 채로,...
[Grammar] ~고자

[Grammar] ~고자

~고자 (~go-ja) – so as to… (someone) did something This is quite similar to ~(으)려고, ~(으)러 and ~도록, we would verbs before and after these grammar particles. You can look at the second action after ~고자 to be the explanation/justification for the first action. Examples: 난...
[Grammar] ~(으)ㄴ/는 척/첵 하다

[Grammar] ~(으)ㄴ/는 척/첵 하다

~은/는/ㄴ 척/첵 하다 (~eun/neun/eun cheo-ka-da/che-ka-da) – acting as if You can look at this as “pretending to” as well, although I personally prefer “acting as if”. This grammar expression can be used for action verbs and descriptive verbs/adjectives. For verbs, attach 는...
[Grammar] ~(으)면서

[Grammar] ~(으)면서

~(으)면서 (~(eu)-myeon-seo) – while doing something (a second action is done simultaneously) For this grammar principle, it’s important to understand the nuance because there are several more other grammar principles with similar meanings but the difference lies in the...